ABOUT

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I discovered sea kayaking on the Georgia coast in the summer of 2011. A tight knit community of paddlers and friends helped introduced me to an area perfect for full immersion in to the sport. Over night and day trips were a weekend regulars and I found myself surfing my kayak as much as I could. All while I had started carving my own Greenland style paddles with hardly any woodworking experience. These beautifully simplistic paddles and fellow paddlers have helped shape my skills and experiences beyond what I could even imagine. 

A passion for sharing and introducing people to wilderness and sea made it feel natural to be an outdoors professional. There's nothing that can replicate the feeling of being immersed in a natural environment, in your own element, in your own kayak. As result, I began sea kayak guide training almost immediately after I started paddling. I started out by shadowing guides and instructors on trips, schlepping sea kayaks, learning courses, where to go and where not based on the tide and conditions, giving instructional and inspirational talks before taking groups out for the day. Ever since, I've been guiding and instructing for Savannah Canoe and Kayak's outfitter shop along with making paddles and running workshops.

STOMPING GROUNDS

From the time I purchased my first sea kayak, local excursions have taken me up and down barrier island stretches. Interconnecting the subtropical forested hammocks though the seemingly countless creeks, rivers, and inlets that make up the patch work of Georgia's, mostly wild, 100 mile coastline.

The tidal range of 6'-11' found here is the largest in the southeast. It shapes the entire coast by shifting entire islands, forming enormous sand bars, and eroding away bone yard beaches that can stretch for miles. The constant flood and ebb of the tide in such a low geographic area creates complex and evolving paddling environments. My favorite and most popular local feature is known as the The Triangle. A park and play tide race that forms in the Backriver Inlet south of Tybee Island over the delta shaped sandbar.